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Resources for the study of the Uzbek language   Tags: central asia, eurasia, folklore, foreign_language_resources, history, language, language learning, literature, russia, slavic, uzbek  

Last Updated: Feb 21, 2014 URL: http://uiuc.libguides.com/uzbek Print Guide RSS Updates

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Center for Languages of the Central Asian Region Online Language Resources

CeLCAR produces a variety of instructional materials for study of foreign languages, including. Uzbek.  To explore their educational offerings go to their website.

 

Geography

Location:

Central Asia, north of Turkmenistan, south of Kazakhstan

Geographic coordinates:

41 00 N, 64 00 E

Area:

total: 447,400 sq km

country comparison to the world: 57

land: 425,400 sq km
water: 22,000 sq km
comparative: slightly larger than California

Land Boundaries:
total: 6,221 km
border countries: Afghanistan 137 km, Kazakhstan 2,203 km, Kyrgyzstan 1,099 km, Tajikistan 1,161 km, Turkmenistan 1,621 km

Coastline:
0 km (doubly landlocked); note - Uzbekistan includes the southern portion of the Aral Sea with a 420 km shoreline
Climate:
mostly midlatitude desert, long, hot summers, mild winters; semiarid grassland in east
Terrain:
mostly flat-to-rolling sandy desert with dunes; broad, flat intensely irrigated river valleys along course of Amu Darya, Syr Darya (Sirdaryo), and Zarafshon; Fergana Valley in east surrounded by mountainous Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan; shrinking Aral Sea in west
Elevation extremes:
lowest point: Sariqamish Kuli -12 m
highest point: Adelunga Toghi 4,301 m

Natural resources:
natural gas, petroleum, coal, gold, uranium, silver, copper, lead and zinc, tungsten, molybdenum
Land use:
arable land: 10.51%
permanent crops: 0.76%
other: 88.73% (2005)

Irrigated land:
42,230 sq km (2008)
(Information from CIA World Factbook)
 

Introduction

Source

Russia conquered the territory of present-day Uzbekistan in the late 19th century. Stiff resistance to the Red Army after the Bolshevik Revolution was eventually suppressed and a socialist republic established in 1924. During the Soviet era, intensive production of "white gold" (cotton) and grain led to overuse of agrochemicals and the depletion of water supplies, which have left the land poisoned and the Aral Sea and certain rivers half dry. Independent since 1991, the country seeks to gradually lessen its dependence on agriculture while developing its mineral and petroleum reserves. Current concerns include terrorism by Islamic militants, economic stagnation, and the curtailment of human rights and democratization. (from CIA World Factbook)

 

Intensive Language Programs

The American Association for Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages (AATSEEL) website has a page that describes intensive programs in Slavic and East European languages as well as in the languages of the Republics of the former Soviet Union. The listings include those programs offered in U.S. (and some Canadian) colleges and universities as well as in programs abroad. This is a free service provided by AATSEEL to such programs.

Each language has its own page, and programs are divided into the following categories: Summer Programs in the U.S., Summer Programs Abroad, and Semester/Year Programs Abroad. Information is added to this page as it is received, so check frequently for updates.

The website has a table which allows you to click on the language you are interested in, and it directs you to links to the program/school websites teaching the language.

 

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